Le Poinçonneur Des Lilas

In the late 1950s film jukeboxes were all the rage in France. These jukeboxes, called Scopitones, were supposedly made from surplus WWII airplane parts and played 16mm film reels. The Scopitones made it across the pond in 1964 and made their U.S. debut in the late lamented Ambassador Hotel.

This early French Scopitone from 1958 takes us to the Porte des Lilas Metro Station in 1958 and Serge Gainsbourg acts as the poinçonneur or ticket puncher.

It’s lots of fun and even shows the first and second class cars that are no longer in service. —Eric See

Vintage Slides: Posing in Pisa. 1954.

This slide certainly falls in the “some things never change” category! Our heroine seems to be doing a pretty good job of “holding up” the tower in an era before instant digital photography.


Stay tuned for a 21st century look at the same pose.

Vintage Slides: The Haring Eaters. Marken, Noord Holland. 1956.

In our continuing series of vintage slides here’s a charming slide from Holland. We believe these slides came from an officer in the American Military stationed in Germany in the 50s.

Here’s a typical picture of tourists devouring the raw “nieuwe” haring. Most Dutch people eat it with a knife and fork.

The photographer wrote that this slide was taken in Marken, an historic and touristic village just north of Amsterdam.

 

Marken

Vintage Slides: Notre Dame de Paris, 1954.

Some things never change and other things change quite a bit!

We’ve found a cache of vintage slides at the Cayucos Antique & Collectibles Street Fair.  We plan to bring you some scans of these vivid slides in the months to come.

To start here’s a picture of Notre Dame.  Scaffolding: that’s something that belongs in the things never change category.

However, what are all those cute cars doing parked right in front?  … and wow, the whole cathedral needs a good scrubbing!  (Stay tuned for a “scrubbed up” version.)

Île de la Cité, Notre Dame de Paris, 1954.

Île de la Cité, Notre Dame de Paris, 1954.


Please click on the picture for a larger version.

Velo Vintage

I like finding places or stores that have vintage things that are either great fun to experience or realtively easy on the pocket book.  A New York Times blog pointed me to a fantastic looking little bicycle shop in Paris that is run by “two childhood friends who decided to open a totally awesome vintage bike shop.”

A neat Peugeot bicycle

I’d love to check out their store in the 18th arrondissement next time I’m in Paris and maybe “test drive all or any of our [Velo Vintage’s] old school bikes.”

Enjoy their colorful website with all the “charm retro des années 70/80”: www.velo-vintage.com/